Home > Legalized Sports Betting Talk For Kansas
Regulation

Legalized Sports Betting Talk For Kansas

All eyes are on Kansas as talk begins for the state in its sports betting regulation legalization. Kansas lawmakers recently received a crash course in sports gambling as they consider how to capitalize on a U.S. Supreme Court ruling in May that lifted a federal ban on it.

Democratic Gov.-elect Laura Kelly voiced support for expanding into sports betting during her campaign. Kansas already allows commercial casino gaming. The challenge is the details, said state Sen. Bud Estes, a Republican from Dodge City who is the chairman of the committee that will handle bills on the topic.

“I don’t want to skate on thin ice on something we don’t know anything about,” he said, while adding that it is “probably” going to happen in some form. 

Key issues reportedly include ensuring the tax rate isn’t so high that betters turn to illegal wagers and providing oversight to prevent fraud or cheating in games. Where and how bets can be cast also raises other questions. Will betting be restricted to casinos or allowed at sports bars, too? Are mobile betting apps permitted? If so, who will manage them?

“If we start passing legislation for interest groups, we could make a real mess,” Estes said. “We need to be educated. I’m not going to let my committee go out and pass a lot of legislation right out of the bag. We need to be smarter before we do it.”

During the last legislative session, Republican Rep. Jan Kessinger, of Overland Park, introduced a bill that received a hearing but failed to gain much traction. Budget officials estimated that it would have generated $75 million a year. He plans to try again next year.

“That is not waving a magic wound, boom,” he said of the revenue such a bill would generate. “It would take a while to get up to speed.”

He said the money could allow the state to address several pressing issues, including foster cases , the state pension system and highways. He said some money would be set aside to help problem gamblers.

Kessinger would like to see sports betting available in social settings, such as sports bars and restaurants.

“It will generate more excitement and interest in sports, which I think will drive more traffic into these social settings,” generating jobs and more revenue from taxes of food and drink sales, he said. “There are a lot of different opportunities there.”

News source: The Associated Press

Related stories

Treasure Chest Opened as Montana Sports Betting Become Law

Daniel Smyth

Arizona Bill to Give State’s Tribes Exclusivity

Joan Mantini

Bill Proposed for Washington Tribal Gaming Sports Betting Legalization

Joan Mantini

It’s a NO for Michigan

Joan Mantini

Illinois Makes Massive Move in Gambling Expansion

Joan Mantini

Smarkets: At the Head of the Class or Ahead of Its Time?

Kate Rowland